Denver home to King Tut, for now

Arts & Entertainment

Denver home to King Tut, for now

SANDRO VANNINI/Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum
This colossal statue of Tutankhamun was found at the remains of the funerary temple of Ay and Horemheb. The belt is inscribed with the name Horemheb, written over the earlier names of Ay and Tutankhamun.
SANDRO VANNINI/Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum
These golden sandals have engraved decoration that replicates woven reeds. Created specifically for the afterlife, they still covered the feet of Tutankhamun when Howard Carter unwrapped the mummy in 1922.

Denver home to King Tut, for now

SANDRO VANNINI/Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum
This colossal statue of Tutankhamun was found at the remains of the funerary temple of Ay and Horemheb. The belt is inscribed with the name Horemheb, written over the earlier names of Ay and Tutankhamun.
SANDRO VANNINI/Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum
These golden sandals have engraved decoration that replicates woven reeds. Created specifically for the afterlife, they still covered the feet of Tutankhamun when Howard Carter unwrapped the mummy in 1922.
If you go

“Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs,” through Jan. 2 at the Denver Art Museum. Admission costs $25 ($30 on weekends); $5 extra for a 3-D movie and audio tour. Tickets are available online at www.tutdenver.com and by phone through Ticketmaster at (877) 888-8587.

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