Global coral bleaching event expected to last through 2016

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Global coral bleaching event expected to last through 2016

Honolulu conference examines growing problem
Bleaching and some dead coral can be seen around Jarvis Island, which is part of the U.S. Pacific Remote Marine National Monument. Scientists found 95 percent of the coral is dead in what had been one of the world’s most lush and isolated tropical marine reserve. More than 2,000 international reef scientists, policymakers and stakeholders are gathering in Hawaii starting Monday to discuss the latest coral science and what can be done to stop widespread death of the world’s reefs.
Much of the inner reef of Oahu’s Hanauma Bay near Honolulu is dead after decades of tourist interaction, but the outer reef is still relatively healthy. More than 2,000 international reef scientists, policymakers and stakeholders are gathering in Hawaii starting Monday to discuss the latest coral science and what can be done to stop widespread death of the world’s reefs.
This photo provided by NOAA shows bleaching and some dead coral around Jarvis Island, which is part of the U.S. Pacific Remote Marine National Monument. Researchers finishing an emergency U.S. government undersea expedition described what they called a graveyard of coral around Jarvis Island in the Pacific Remote Island Marine National Monument. Normally, a unique ocean current brings cold water up from the deep to make that underwater region vibrant with coral, nutrients, fish and sharks.

Global coral bleaching event expected to last through 2016

Bleaching and some dead coral can be seen around Jarvis Island, which is part of the U.S. Pacific Remote Marine National Monument. Scientists found 95 percent of the coral is dead in what had been one of the world’s most lush and isolated tropical marine reserve. More than 2,000 international reef scientists, policymakers and stakeholders are gathering in Hawaii starting Monday to discuss the latest coral science and what can be done to stop widespread death of the world’s reefs.
Much of the inner reef of Oahu’s Hanauma Bay near Honolulu is dead after decades of tourist interaction, but the outer reef is still relatively healthy. More than 2,000 international reef scientists, policymakers and stakeholders are gathering in Hawaii starting Monday to discuss the latest coral science and what can be done to stop widespread death of the world’s reefs.
This photo provided by NOAA shows bleaching and some dead coral around Jarvis Island, which is part of the U.S. Pacific Remote Marine National Monument. Researchers finishing an emergency U.S. government undersea expedition described what they called a graveyard of coral around Jarvis Island in the Pacific Remote Island Marine National Monument. Normally, a unique ocean current brings cold water up from the deep to make that underwater region vibrant with coral, nutrients, fish and sharks.
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